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Special Collections and Archives Public Health Subject Guide: Human/Sex Trafficking

Human / Sex Trafficking: Manuscript Collections

Deborah Richardson Papers, 1996-2008 (W086)
Deborah J. Richardson has served as a manager and executive for a number of nonprofit organizations. Richardson's papers include newsletters, articles, speeches, and programs related to her career and organizations that she served, including the National Black Arts Festival and the Juvenile Justice Fund.

Human / Sex Trafficking: Oral Histories

Stephanie Davis, September 29, 2010 (W071)
Stephanie Davis is the executive director of Georgia Women For a Change, a non-profit public policy institute with a gender lens, that represents Georgia activists across a spectrum of issues including health care, economic justice and challenging violence against women and girls. Georgia Women for a Change introduced legislation to combat human trafficking and institute flexible sick leave policy. Davis served as the first Policy Advisor on Women's Issues to Mayor Shirley Franklin and in that role, coordinated the "Dear John" campaign to end the prostitution of children in Atlanta. As the first director of the Atlanta Women's Foundation, where she served for 11 years, Davis was responsible for raising several million dollars, establishing an endowment and positioning the Foundation to be the fastest growing women's fund in the country. Davis currently serves on the Board of Synchronicity Theatre and the Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence. She is a graduate of Skidmore College and recieved one of the country's first Masters in women's studies from Goddard College.

Mary Finn, June 28, 2012 (W071)
Dr. Mary Finn’s research addresses problems and issues directly related to justice policy and practice. Over the course of her career, she has collaborated with local justice agencies, advocacy organizations, and divisions of the state government in efforts to bridge the world of academia and the world of policy and practice. Her current research focuses on evaluation of justice system responses to crime, primarily violence against women and children.  She currently works on two projects funded by the National Institute of Justice.  First, she serves as the local research partner for the Domestic Violence Homicide Prevention Initiative in Rockdale County, Georgia, one of 12 sites selected in the nation.  Second, she serves as a co-principal investigator (with Applied Research Services) on research to assess the influence of home visit themes and their temporal ordering on the supervision outcomes with high-risk parolees.  Her most recent publications appear in Criminology & Public Policy, Crime & Delinquency, and the Journal of Interpersonal Violence.

Kaffie McCullough, June 16, 2011 (W071)
Kaffie McCullough received her masters degree in Community Counseling in 1986 and launched a successful 10-year career as a licensed professional counselor. Her work focused on female clients and issues of self-esteem. While she was in her private therapy practice, McCullough saw a number of middle school clients, and as a result, she identified that age as the pivotal time when the decline in self-esteem begins.
Drawing on experience gained volunteering in a week-long outdoor leadership camp for young girls at Wells, McCullough founded the not-for-profit organization, Girls Opportunities for Adventure and Leadership (GOAL). GOAL's mission was to promote self-esteem, self-awareness and a respect for individual differences in girls and young women, resulting in an enhanced capacity for leadership. GOAL started as a week-long summer camp, and went on to offer a number of programs for girls in grades 6 through 9. Along with her entrepreneurial successes, McCullough has served the Atlanta community as a speaker, resource, and advisor for other groups working on programs for girls and young women. She now works with the Juvenile Justice Fund, overseeing A Future Not A Past, a program aimed at combating the criminal exploitation of children.

Kaffie McCullough, July 21, 2011 (W071)

Deborah Richardson, June 24, 2008 (W071)
Deborah J. Richardson is the Executive Vice President of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights leading its fundraising and program development. Previously, she was Chief Program Officer at Women’s Funding Network in San Francisco, CEO of The Atlanta Women’s Foundation, Director of Program Development for Fulton County Juvenile Court, founding Executive Director of the Juvenile Justice Fund (now Youth Spark) and Managing Director of the National Black Arts Festival. Among Richardson's many awards are: The Community Leadership Award by Spelman College Board of Trustees, The Legacy Award by the Juvenile Justice Fund and The Grassroots Justice Award by the Georgia Justice Project. She also received  the Lives of Commitment Award from Auburn Theological Seminary and The Pathbreaker Award from Shared Hope International. Richardson is a nationally recognized leader on social justice for women and girls and an advocate to end child sex trafficking. She is the co-author of "Ending Sex Trafficking of Children in Atlanta" and a national spokesperson for A Future. Not a Past (now Youth Spark, Inc.), a campaign to stop the sexual trafficking of children.

Human / Sex Trafficking: Periodicals

Women's Printed Collections: Periodicals

  • Frontline: The Newsletter of the National Runaway Switchboard (Chicago, IL: National Runaway Switchboard), 1998-1999 (Box F-3)

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