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Library Faculty Research Resources: Planning Your Research

IRDL

Institute for Research Design in Librarianship

The Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL) takes place on Loyola Marymount University's Los Angeles Campus.in the second week of June every year. The 2020 institute occurred virtually if it happened at all.

You can apply for the 2021 Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL) when the applications become available.

The Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL) looks for applications from librarians employed by academic or research libraries in the United States. IRDL seeks novice researchers with a passion for research and a desire to improve their research skills. IRDL is designed to bring together all that the literature tells us about the necessary conditions for librarians to conduct valid and reliable research in an institutional setting.

Applications are accepted in December and January, and probably become available during the fall. Applicants receive notification in early March.

Learning Opportunities

Opportunities for Learning

Surveys and Questionnaires

Survey Help

Research Methodology

Research Methodology Books and Articles

  • Bibliography of Research Methods Text -- The introductory page that leads to a a curated selection of research related books. Books are not full text, but there is a link to Worldcat or you can copy the title and search GSU's collection for them.
  • Basic Research Methods for Librarians -- By Lynn Silipigni Connaway and Ronald R. Powell
    Ebook Central Z669.7 .P68 2004
    Conducting research and successfully publishing the findings is a goal of many professionals and students in library and information science (LIS). Using the best methodology maximizes the likelihood of a successful outcome. This outstanding book broadly covers the principles, data collection techniques, and analyses of quantitative and qualitative methods as well as the advantages and limitations of each method to research design.
  • Observing the User Experience -- Elizabeth Goodman, Mike Kuniavsky, Andrea Moed
    O'Reilly Higher Education
    Observing the User Experience: A Practitioner’s Guide to User Research aims to bridge the gap between what digital companies think they know about their users and the actual user experience. Individuals engaged in digital product and service development often fail to conduct user research. The book presents concepts and techniques to provide an understanding of how people experience products and services. The techniques are drawn from the worlds of human-computer interaction, marketing, and social sciences.
  • The Practice of Social Resource -- Earl R. Babbie
    Atlanta -- H62 .B2 2016
    This thorough revision of Babbie’s standard-setting text presents a succinct, straightforward introduction to the field of research methods as practiced by social scientists.
  • Research Methods in Library and Information Science, 6th Edition -- Lynn Silipigni Connaway, Marie L. Radford, and Ronald R. Powell
    Ebook Central Z669.7.C666 2017
    Conducting research and successfully publishing the findings is a goal of many professionals and students in library and information science (LIS). Using the best methodology maximizes the likelihood of a successful outcome. This outstanding book broadly covers the principles, data collection techniques, and analyses of quantitative and qualitative methods as well as the advantages and limitations of each method to research design.
  • LARK's Research Methods -- For the Library and Information Science student and others new to research, this page includes resources about research methods in LIS and the Social Sciences. Included on this page are links to sites that provide information about qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods research. A table is included that gives brief descriptions of some research methods, links to more information and links to some examples.

Working with Data

Working with Data

  • Research Data Services -- The RDS Team offers support to GSU students, faculty, and staff in the areas of data analysis tools & methods, mapping & data visualization, finding data & statistics, data collection, and data management.
  • Statistics and Data: Demographics -- A GSU Library Research Guide with links to data and statistics in any social science subject. The section on Finding, Collecting, Analyzing and Citing Data are especially useful to the librarian-researcher.
  • LARKS -- Research Tools -- A selective assortment of links about how to do and fund research. Half way down the page are two groups of links that cover finding and manipulating data.
  • NCES Academic Library Data Files -- Datasets from the National Center for Education Statistics' Library Statistics Program. The "Compare Academic Libraries" tool can be used to generate comparative reports from the data. Note: the most recent data set is 2012.
  • Thematic Data Collections -- Gateway to reports, tables, and data sets on dozens of social-science related subjects, including education.
  • National Archive of DAta on Arts and Culture -- Features free and easy access to data on the arts and on the arts' value and impact for individuals and communities. Includes data about libraries.