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Georgia Transgender Oral History Project: About the Georgia Transgender Oral History Project

About the Georgia Transgender Oral History Project

ABOUT THE PROJECT
The Georgia Transgender Oral History Project will gather and preserve stories, memories, and histories with transgender people and allies who live/lived in Georgia, or who have participated in activities that affect Georgia.
 

WHO CAN PARTICIPATE?
Anyone who identifies with the term trans or gender non-conforming is welcome to participate as an interviewee in the first phase of the project. Thereafter, we would also like to interview allies. If you do not identify as trans, but would like to assist with this project, your volunteer energy would be greatly appreciated!

We need help with:

  • Assistance to identify individuals to be interviewed.
  • Assistance with transcription, synchronization, and summarizing interviews, and we can provide training. 
  • Financial assistance to support transcription, software, and interviewee stipends.
  • Safe, quiet spaces with robust internet connections for interview locations.


HOW WILL THE INTERVIEWS BE ACCESSED?
Depending on the wishes of the participants, interviews will be transcribed. Transcripts and available audio and/or video will be made available via the Library's Digital Collections website.

About the Project Coordinators

Morna Gerrard (she/her)
Morna Gerrard is the Women’s / Gender & Sexuality Collections Archivist in Special Collections and Archives at the Georgia State University Library. She serves on the National Center for Civil and Human Rights’ LGBTQ Institute Advisory Board, and from 2011-2018, was the vice president of the Georgia LGBTQ Archives Project. She has published a number of articles and chapters, including, “No Fame Required: Collaboration, Community, and the LGBTQ Archives Project,” in Appraisal and Acquisition: Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections, and “Exploring Gender Roles in Society, Literature, and Film,” in Gender Studies in the Library: Case Studies, Programming, Outreach.

 

AC Panella (he/him, they/them)
AC Panella is a doctoral candidate at Union Institute and University. He is in the humanities concentration and is getting certificates in museum studies and educational leadership. As a trans activist and teacher, he has worked on a variety of projects including the Trans Leadership Academy, The LA Trans Health Coalition, and has been an advisor to queer student organizations for 15 years. His research is focused on trans collective memory and history as it’s represented in visual and material culture. When he isn’t nose-deep in research, he is a full-time teacher, pet parent, and truncle (Trans-Uncle) to a super adorable three-year-old. This year, he will defend his dissertation on the role San Francisco’s Compton Cafeteria Uprising has on trans memory.

About the Advisors

The following individuals have generously provided advice and support for this project:

E.R. Anderson (they/them, he/him)
E.R. Anderson is a queer Southern writer, bookseller, and editor from Atlanta, Georgia. Anderson is the Executive Director of Charis Circle, the non-profit programming arm of Charis Books and More, the nation’s oldest and largest feminist bookstore. Anderson’s novel in progress, Paradise Park, tells the story of the Turners, an Evangelical Catholic family of six, who operate a sin and salvation-themed amusement park in Alapaha, Georgia. When not writing, Anderson is a recovering academic, lazy athlete, and a serious lover of bulldogs, cooking, and the Atlanta Braves.

 


 

William Fratus Britto
William Britto is a native of Durham, North Carolina, graduating from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) with a bachelor of music in education. While at UNCG, he served as a resident hall advisor, peer academic leader, and president of the university’s chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). William also served as an orientation coordinator, often facilitating training and workshops for incoming students with a focal point of student success and identity. Upon moving to the Atlanta Metropolitan area in 2013, William taught in the Cobb County School District.

 


 

Tracee McDaniel (she/her) is the founder and Executive Director of the Juxtaposed Center for Transformation, an advocacy, consulting and social services organization specifically designed to empower the trans and gender non-conforming community. In 2013, Tracee published Transitions: Memoirs of a Transsexual Women, and 2014, she became a vetted trainer for the United States Department of Justice CRS program, "Law Enforcement and Transgender Community," which educates federal law enforcement officers how to better interact with Trans people.  In 2015, Tracee was invited to brief the White House about employment and economic equity at its Trans Women of Color History Month Briefing. In 2016, she was appointed to serve on the Atlanta Citizen Review Board.

Tracee organized Atlanta's annual Trans Day of Rememberance Vigils for ten years. She also served on the Trans Housing Atlanta Program's board of directors, the Center for Civil and Human Rights LGBTQ Institute Advisory Board, and Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms' TLGBQI Advisory Council. In 2020, Tracee was recognized in a resolution from the Georgia House of Representatives, when she received the Yellow Rose Nikki T. Randall Servant Leadership Award.
 

AC Panella (he/him, they/them)
AC Panella is a doctoral candidate at Union Institute and University. He is in the humanities concentration and is getting certificates in museum studies and educational leadership. As a trans activist and teacher, he has worked on a variety of projects including the Trans Leadership Academy, The LA Trans Health Coalition, and has been an advisor to queer student organizations for 15 years. His research is focused on trans collective memory and history as it’s represented in visual and material culture. When he isn’t nose-deep in research, he is a full-time teacher, pet parent, and truncle (Trans-Uncle) to a super adorable three-year-old. This year, he will defend his dissertation on the role San Francisco’s Compton Cafeteria Uprising has on trans memory.

About the Interviewers

Tracee McDaniel (she/her) is the founder and Executive Director of the Juxtaposed Center for Transformation, an advocacy, consulting and social services organization specifically designed to empower the trans and gender non-conforming community. In 2013, Tracee published Transitions: Memoirs of a Transsexual Women, and 2014, she became a vetted trainer for the United States Department of Justice CRS program, "Law Enforcement and Transgender Community," which educates federal law enforcement officers how to better interact with Trans people.  In 2015, Tracee was invited to brief the White House about employment and economic equity at its Trans Women of Color History Month Briefing. In 2016, she was appointed to serve on the Atlanta Citizen Review Board..

Tracee organized Atlanta's annual Trans Day of Rememberance Vigils for ten years. She also served on the Trans Housing Atlanta Program's board of directors, the Center for Civil and Human Rights LGBTQ Institute Advisory Board, and Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms' TLGBQI Advisory Council. In 2020, Tracee was recognized in a resolution from the Georgia House of Representatives, when she received the Yellow Rose Nikki T. Randall Servant Leadership Award.


AC Panella (he/him, they/them)
AC Panella is a doctoral candidate at Union Institute and University. He is in the humanities concentration and is getting certificates in museum studies and educational leadership. As a trans activist and teacher, he has worked on a variety of projects including the Trans Leadership Academy, The LA Trans Health Coalition, and has been an advisor to queer student organizations for 15 years. His research is focused on trans collective memory and history as it’s represented in visual and material culture. When he isn’t nose-deep in research, he is a full-time teacher, pet parent, and truncle (Trans-Uncle) to a super adorable three-year-old. This year, he will defend his dissertation on the role San Francisco’s Compton Cafeteria Uprising has on trans memory.
 

 

Heidi Schureck (they/she) resides on Mvskoke land referred to by settlers as Lilburn, Georgia. She is a nuerodivergent gender expansive queer. Her interests range from making insect shadow boxes and care packages for friends to gardening and all things GLAM (galleries, libraries, archives, & museums). She am especially passionate about queering institutions and connecting through community. 

Special Collections and Archives

Special Collections and Archives

Oral Histories at GSU

Archives for Research on Women and Gender

Donna Novak Coles Georgia Women's Movement Archives

Lucy Hargrett Draper Collections on Women's Rights, Advocacy, and the Law

Phone: (404) 413-2880
Fax: (404) 413-2881
E-Mail: archives@gsu.edu

Mailing Address:
Special Collections & Archives
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Atlanta, Georgia 30303-3202

In Person:
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