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Neurophilosophy: Subject Guide: Information for Instructors: Online Instruction

Zotero

Zotero is a free Firefox plugin that easily saves citations from the library catalog, most library databases, and other sites like Amazon, IMDB, and the New York Times online. See the library's Zotero guide for information about downloading Zotero and for useful tips.

I can also help you with Zotero! Please contact me at janderson73@gsu.edu if you have questions about Zotero or would like to schedule a Zotero session for your class, or to schedule an individual appointment for Zotero learning.

Endnote

Endnote is a widely-used bibliographic reference software program that can help you organize your citations. It is free to Georgia State faculty, staff and students.

Please see the EndNote information page if you have questions about Endnote.

Don't want to download the software? Use EndNoteWeb, the Web-based version that allows you to access your citations from any computer, any where, any time. Go to the EndNoteWeb homepage for more information.

Looking for Films or TV Shows?

The library has several streaming film databases: Kanopy, Films on Demand, and SWANK. To link to a film in one of these databases, look for the "permalink" in the film's database.

We are not able to provide access to commercial film streaming sites like Netflix or Hulu (and so on) as these sites do not sell licenses to libraries or institutions. The site JustWatch.com provides information on commercial streaming options for films and television shows, which can help you identify low-cost options where possible.

If you have a public library card/account*, you may be able to stream films through that library account. Contact that library directly to see what your access options are.

*GSU students and faculty are eligible to get a library card from the Fulton County Public Library System, which does provide access to some streaming films. Learn more about getting a card here.

Distributing Course Materials Electrically/Online

As we move to online instruction for the summer (and possibly for the fall), it's important to keep in mind that there are legal issues involved in distributing course information online. (As you may know, GSU is still involved in a lawsuit begun in 2008 regarding this very subject!).

Key points:

  • Do not post course material on an open website (that is, one that does not require password access)
  • Post your course materials in online spaces that will limit access to only the students enrolled in your class (both iCollege and Library eReserves are examples of such spaces)
  • You are still required to follow the USG Copyright Policy and Fair Use guidelines for posting copyrighted material -- even if you are posting in iCollege and Library eReserves

Helpful guides from the Library:

On posting/linking to course materials in iCollege:

Journal Articles

Electronically available through the Library: Link directly to the article rather than uploading the PDF directly. This is the easiest and legally safest way to include an electronic article in iCollege.

To do this: Locate the article in a database, then look for a permanent URL (look for language like "persistent" or "permalink" or "stable" URL). The URL in the main address bar is a temporary URL that will NOT link students to the article: the "permanent" URL is the one that will do that!

Not electronically available through the Library:

Before you post a PDF directly to iCollege, read the USG Copyright Policy thoroughly and use the USG Fair Use Checklist as a tool to help you determine if your use of the item for the course is considered fair use. Save a copy of the completed USG Fair Use Checklist for your record and consider including a statement somewhere in iCollege to the effect that you have assessed that your sharing of this copyrighted material falls within fair use guidelines.

Books/Book Chapters

Search in the library catalog to see if an e-version of the book is available (see also our eBooks research guide for help on searching, and a list of databases below that include full-text ebooks for instructional use). If the book is available, look for the "permalink" icon or and include the link in iCollege.

If you want to scan book chapters to upload a PDF directly to iCollege, read the USG Copyright Policy thoroughly and use the USG Fair Use Checklist as a tool to help you determine if your use of the item for the course is considered fair use. ii. NOTE: You must save a copy of the completed USG Fair Use Checklist for your records. Save a copy of the completed USG Fair Use Checklist for your record and consider including a statement somewhere in iCollege to the effect that you have assessed that your sharing of this copyrighted material falls within fair use guidelines.

Fair use guidelines generally do not permit for entire books (or for substantial portions of books) to be scanned and posted.

**IMPORTANT: As of AUGUST 24, 2020 we will no longer have access to the HathiTrust Emergency Access Library**

Additionally, some academic publishers are temporarily making ebooks available (for example, a number of presses are temporarily making their e-resources available through Project Muse -- see this list for further information.). Check a publisher's site to see if they are offering temporary access.

Films

The library has several streaming film databases: Kanopy, Films on Demand, and SWANK. To link to a film in one of these databases, look for the "permalink" in the film's database.

We are not able to provide access to commercial film streaming sites like Netflix or Hulu (and so on) as these sites do not sell licenses to libraries or institutions. The site JustWatch.com provides information on commercial streaming options for films and television shows, which can help you identify low-cost options where possible. For other tips on finding streaming films, see the Video section of the library's Resources for Teaching and Learning Online guide.

You can also check on a film's site (or the distributor's site) to see if there are other streaming options available directly to you; these options will not be available through the library, but may be available to you individually.

What if the above options don't apply?

You must obtain permission to use the item. You generally can obtain permissions from the Copyright Clearance Center or from the copyright holder (generally the publisher).

Open Educational Resources

Open Educational Resources (OERs) are teaching materials in a broad range of formats (from full courses to textbooks to streaming videos and many other kinds of learning objects) which are either in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license which allows others to use them freely or repurpose as needed. See the LIbrary's Open Education guide for further information and assistance. See also our new database, Faculty Select, useful for searching for open or low-cost educational materials:

Teaching Online?

In response to the coronavirus and GSU's shift to online instruction for May/Summer 2020, the Library has created the Resources for Teaching and Learning Online research guide to help instructors adjust to online instruction.

In May 2020 I will be taking CETL's Mastering Online Teaching course in May 2020 in order to better support online instruction this summer (and fall?).

Possible options for integrating library instruction into your online teaching include:

  1. Adding a link to the Library's home page to your iCollege course
  2. Adding a course guide or a subject guide (like this one!) into your iCollege course
  3. Adding a pre-recorded tutorial or other online learning object involving library instruction/skills/learning into your iCollege course (asynchronous)
  4. Me conducting some form of synchronous instruction for the class via WebEx or Zoom
  5. Some combination of asynchronous/synchronous instruction

As I work through the MOT course, I hope to be able to design more creative options, especially in areas #3-#5, and am happy to talk with you about possibilities as I learn more.

Class Instruction

If you would like to schedule a library instruction session for your classes, please contact me at janderson73@gsu.edu.

Please provide the following information when requesting a session:

  • Your name
  • The course you teach
  • The day and time your class meets
  • Preferred and alternative days you would like the session
  • Number of students in the class
  • How the library instruction would relate to a particular assignment

I'm always happy to talk with you about possible instructional options/assignments for your classes.

I can also teach Zotero sessions and/or provide individual Zotero instruction by appointment.

Additionally, I am strongly interested in primary source-based instruction, either on my own or in collaboration with Special Collections & Archives.

  • I have collaborated with Popular Music and Culture Archivist Kevin Fleming on a number of workshops and class instruction sessions (some of which are described here). Kevin and I, along with Prof. Ewa McGrail from CEHD, are co-recipients of GSU's 2019 Faculty Instructional Innovation Award.
  • Kevin and I are also members of the Teaching with Primary Sources Collective, which is exploring creative ways of moving archival/primary source instruction into online instruction. We're happy to talk with you about options that would incorporate digital primary sources from Special Collections' Digital Collections as well as from our subscription databases and/or freely available digital collections.

Sessions can be taught in your classroom, in one of the computer classrooms in the library, or in the library's Colloquium Room (if Special Collections materials are being used). Two week's notice is preferred if possible.