Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

**HON 1000: ‘Going Steady?’: Documenting the History of Dating in American Culture, 1940-1990 (Anderson/Fall 2018)

Why cite?

Citing your sources is an important part of the scholarly writing process. Citations include the key elements that allow your sources to be identified and located - author, title, date, etc. The actual format of the citation depends on the resource type as well as the documentation style you are using.

There are several reasons to cite:

  • Give proper credit to the ideas, words, and works of others you use in your research
  • Allow readers to find your sources - so they can determine if they are reliable, better evaluate your argument, and locate additional information
  • Avoid plagiarism

Citation Styles for Class: Chicago Manual of Style

Historians generally use the Chicago Manual of Style or its derivative, A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations (commonly known as Turabian, after its author). Though not identical, the two styles are very similar.

Always check with your instructor to find out which citation style he or she wants you to use.

We will be using the Chicago Manual of Style.

The library provides access to the Chicago Manual of Style Online
for GSU students/faculty/staff.

The Purdue OWL site is also a good resource for Chicago Manual of Style citing information. 

Hard copies of the Chicago Manual of Style are also available at the Research Support Desk on Library North 1.

Building Blocks of a Reference

      The basic components of a reference are:

  • Author
  • Title (for an article, the article title comes first, followed by journal title)
  • Publication information (publisher location/name)
  • Date
  • Page numbers (where applicable)
  • Online access information (where applicable)

Creative Commons licensed image by Flickr user Holger Zscheyge

Chicago Citation Basics: Footnotes and Endnotes

BOOK

First and Last Name of Author, Book Title: Subtitle (City/State Where Published: Name of Publisher, Year), page numbers.

Rachel Hope Cleves, Charity and Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014).

BOOK CHAPTER

First and Last Name of Author, "Chapter Title," in Book Title: Subtitle, ed. by First and Last Name (City/State Where Published: Name of Publisher, Year), page numbers.

Amanda H. Littauer, “‘Someone to Love’: Teen Girls’ Same-Sex Desire in the 1950s United States,” in Queer 1950s: Rethinking Sexuality in the Postwar Years, ed. Heike Bauer and Matt Cook (New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), 61–76.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

First and Last Name of Author [only if known], "Article Title" Journal Name Volume Number, Issue Number (Month Year): page numbers, URL [if available electronically].

Valerie Matsumoto, “Redefining Expectations: Nisei Women in the 1930s,” California History 73, no. 1 (1994): 44–53, https://doi.org/10.2307/25177398.

MAGAZINE ARTICLE

First and Last Name of Author [only if known], "Article Title," Magazine Name, Month Day, Year, page number.

Sylvia Plath, “Twelfth Night,” Seventeen, December 1952, 79.

NEWSPAPER ARTICLE

First and Last Name of Author [only if known], "Article Title," Newspaper Name, Month Day, Year.

Isabel Wilkerson, “36 Years Later, an Integrated Georgia Prom,” New York Times, May 14, 1990.

Chicago Citation Basics: Bibliography

BOOK

Authors Last Name, First Name. Book Title: Subtitle. City/State Where Published: Name of Publisher, Year.

Cleves, Rachel Hope. Charity and Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

BOOK CHAPTER

Authors Last Name, First Name. "Chapter Title." In Book Title: Subtitle, page numbers. Edited by First and Last Name. Where Published: Name of Publisher, Year.

Littauer, Amanda H. “‘Someone to Love’: Teen Girls’ Same-Sex Desire in the 1950s United States.” In Queer 1950s: Rethinking Sexuality in the Postwar Years, edited by Heike Bauer and Matt Cook, 61–76. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Last Name, First Name. "Article Title." Journal Name Volume Number, Issue Number (Month Year): page numbers, URL [if available electronically].

Matsumoto, Valerie. “Redefining Expectations: Nisei Women in the 1930s.” California History 73, no. 1 (1994): 44–53. https://doi.org/10.2307/25177398.

MAGAZINE ARTICLE

Last Name, First Name. "Article Title." Magazine Name. Month Day, Year, page numbers.

Plath, Sylvia. “Twelfth Night.” Seventeen, December 1952, 79.

NEWSPAPER ARTICLE

Authors Last Name, First Name [only if known]. " Article Title." Newspaper Name, Month Day, Year.

Wilkerson, Isabel. “36 Years Later, an Integrated Georgia Prom.” New York Times. May 14, 1990.

How to Cite: By Source Type

Quick links showing how to cite various source types.

These links will show you what kinds of information need to included in a citation for the citation to be complete.