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Researching & Writing Literature Reviews in Religious Studies: Find Articles

What is peer review?

  A peer reviewed journal article is an article that has been reviewed and chosen for publication by the author's professional peers. These peers are scholars in the field, who sit on the editorial board of a journal which is usually published by a professional organization or a university press. Peer reviewed articles can also be known as scholarly or refereed articles. 

Citation Searches

Need to locate an online version of an article for which you already have the citation? Try the library's

Citation Linker

To use:

  • Enter as much information as you have about the article (title, journal name, volume, issue, etc.) into the form and click GO.
  • From the resulting page, click on the name of the database which includes the year of the article you need.
  • Follow the available options to locate the article.

Religious Studies Subject Specific Article Databases

Use the following databases to locate articles in scholarly journals specific to religious studies topics.

Other Subject Specific Article Databases

You may need to search the following non-religious studies subject databases to ensure that you are locating all of the relevant information on your topic. The following are just a few of the many subject-specific databases available to you through the library. To locate additional databases, consult the library's list of Databases by Name.

General Article Databases (covering multiple subject areas)

The following multi-discliplinary databases also contain scholarly articles pertinent to research in religious studies.

Still not finding what you need?

 Try the Library's Discover Search.

Discover searches across most of the library's databases and holdings using one simple search tool.

Advanced Discover Search or use the search box below.

GSU Library's Discover Search
Limit Your Results:

(Note: This search may turn up a LOT of results!
Use the Advanced Search option to help you narrow down your results.)

Using "Advanced Search" in Databases

Most databases have an Advanced Search option that will let you limit your search in some helpful ways:

  • Limit by year of publication (helpful if you need the most current scholarship/literature)
  • Limit to scholarly/peer-reviewed articles (this is often just a box you can check)
  • Limit by language (if you read a particular language or languages, you can select those; you can also limit your search to just items in English)

Different subject databases may have other options as well, but most of our databases have these as Advanced Search options.

* * * * *

One box that you SHOULD NOT CHECK is the "Full Text" box. Sounds backwards, I know, but here's why:

Many databases will give you only the citation for a particular article and not the full text.

But! We have lots of databases, and the article that you need may be in a different database. I

f you find an article that you want, and it looks like we don't have full text, click the blue "Find It @ GSU" button (see box below). That button will point you to the article if it's held in another database, or will help you set up an Interlibrary Loan for the article. (Yes, you can place requests for articles via Interlibrary Loan during the coronavirus crisis -- article requests are handled electronically).

If you check the "Full Text" box in a database, you're actually saying that you only want articles that that particular database has available in "full text." You're shutting off that "Find It @ GSU" option.

Database Search Tips

1. For off-campus access, enter your Campus ID and Password at the prompt.

2. Use the Advanced Search option within the database you are using to achieve the best results.

3. Keep your search terms brief and concise.

4. Check your spelling. Library databases do not correct spelling errors.

5. If your first set of search terms doesn't retrieve any results, try using synonyms that describe your topic.

6. You can search for different forms of a word (different word endings of the same word), by typing the first few letters followed by an asterisk. Example:

  • myst* will search for mystic, mystics, mystical, mysticism, mystagogy, etc.

7. Use double quotation marks around two or more words to search as a phrase. Example:

  • “divine law" 

8. Use the connecting words AND and OR to narrow or broaden your search. Examples:

  • faith AND belief - to search for articles that include both terms (narrows the search results)
  • faith OR belief - to search for articles that contain either term (broadens the search results)

9. You can create more complex searches by using the words AND, OR, NOT, in combination with parentheses. Example:

  • religion AND (faith OR belief)

10. If don’t see a full-text link (HTML full text or PDF), try clicking on the

button near the citation to the article. Clicking this button will check for full text availability outside of the database you are currently searching. A new window will open and if the full text is available you will see a Full Text Online link. Click on the link to access the full text of the article. 

Ask a Librarian for help if you can't find what you need!