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HON 3260: Women in Science: Retention/
Attrition

ARTICLES & ONLINE SOURCES

Lien, T. (February 22, 2015). Why are women leaving the tech industry in droves? Los Angeles Times Online. 


Fleur, N. S. (2014). Many women leave engineering, blame the work culture. NPR: All Tech Considered.


Hunt, J. (2010). Why do women leave science and engineering? NBER Working Paper No. 15853, National Bureau of Economic Research.


O’Brien, K. R., & Hapgood, K. P. (2012). The academic jungle: Ecosystem modelling reveals why women are driven out of research. Oikos, 121(7), 999–1004. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0706.2012.20601.x


Glass, J. L., Sassler, S., Levitte, Y., & Michelmore, K. M. (2013). What’s so special about STEM? A comparison of women’s retention in STEM and professional occupations. Social Forces, 92(2), 723-756.


Fouad, N., Romila, S., Fitzpatrick, M. E., & Liu, J. P. (2012). Stemming the tide: Why women leave engineering. University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.


Buse, K., Bilimoria, D., & Perelli, S. (1996). Why they stay: Women persisting in U.S. engineering careers. Career Development International, 18(2), 139-154. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/CDI-11-2012-0108


Wyer, M. (2003). Intending to stay: Images of scientists, attitudes towards women, and gender as influences on persistence among science and engineering majors. Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, 9(1), 1-16.

BOOKS

DR. CLELIA MOSHER


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NASA, 1975


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